CIRMMT Symposium on Force Feedback and Music

Dec 9-10, 2016. See the symposium website for more information and for registration.cirmmt_logo2005onlyhi

Though haptics research in music is a very active research field, it seems presently dominated by tactile interfaces, due in part to the widespread availability of vibrotactile feedback in portable devices. Though not recent—with some of its early contributions dating back to the end of the 70s—research on force-feedback in musical applications has traditionally suffered from exogenous issues such as hardware cost, as well as the lack of community-wide accessibility to software and hardware platforms for prototyping musical applications. Despite this situation, in recent years several works have addressed this topic proposing software platforms and simulation models.

This symposium will discuss the current state of research and future trends on force-feedback and music (FF&M).

Speakers

  • Bret Battey, De Montfort University, England
  • Edgar Berdahl, Louisiana State University, USA
  • Christian Frisson, Inria Lille, France
  • Alexandros Kontogeorgakopoulos, Cardiff School of Art and Design, Wales [on career break]
  • James Leonard, Grenoble, France
  • Joseph Malloch, Dalhousie University, Canada
  • Julian Neri, McGill University, Canada
  • Thomas Pietrzak, Université Lille 1, France
  • Ian Sinclair, MPB Technologies Inc, Canada
  • Stephen Sinclair, Inria, Chile
  • Marcelo Wanderley, IDMIL/CIRMMT, McGill University, Canada

3DMIN Symposium

3dmin-symposium-fb-event-header-768x289

Last week I was back in Berlin for an exhibition, concert and international symposium on Design, Development, and Dissemination of New Musical Instruments (3DMIN). The symposium was titled “Musical Instruments in the 21st Century — Identities, Configurations, Practices” and included a range of interesting speakers from the 3DMIN project itself and invitees like myself. The other speakers included:

Stick instruments: neon-guitar

This fantastic video was recently brought to my attention because of the tubular instruments’ similarity to the T-Sticks, though in appearance they are more similar to the UV Stick developed by Leonello Tarabella et al. at the Computer Music Lab of CNUCE/C.N.R. in the 1990’s (pdf 102KB)

The 1024 architecture blog describes the new instruments (QC in this context is Apple’s Quartz Composer):

We are developping a light-based musical instrument, the neon-guitar…. The light part is controlled via a QC patch, while the audio is currently driven by AULab.

 

And some background on the creators:

1024 architecture is a company created by Pierre SCHNEIDER and François WUNSCHEL, both co-founders of the EXYZT collective.
1024 architecture focuses on the interaction between body, space, sound, visual, low-tech and hi-tech, art and architecture…

We make audio-visual installations, micro-architecture, urban intervention, performances, exhibitions and others…

I’ll try to write a short post on each of the other “stick-like” digital musical instruments I have catalogued.