The Psychogeographer’s Table

This project is a collaboration between GEM Lab and the Narratives in Space+Time Society (NiS+TS). It serves as a public platform for exploring the past and present urban geography of the area surrounding the Narrows where the Halifax Explosion took place in December 1917. The tabletop consists of a semi-opaque glass projection surface representing the harbour and solid pine CNC-shaped forms for land. Projection mapping is used to project various content on the tabletop, including aerial photographs and historical maps showing the devastation caused by the explosion. Additional computer-generated content can be interactively explored using a Microsoft HoloLens head-mounted display.

Psychogeographer's Table

Motion Blur

Just found some fun images while cleaning up some old files. The motion blur makes the gestures of the performer hang in the air, communicating much more information than a simple static image.

Motion-blurred images of the T-Stick in performance
Alexander Refsum Jensenius uses a more sophisticated video-processing technique to produce motiongrams and videograms, which he uses for analysis of musical performance. You can read about them in his PhD Dissertation.

Fun photo manipulation

I spent a few minutes the other day messing around with the online face transformer from the University of St Andrew’s Perception Lab. It allows you to upload a photo and “transform” it into someone older, younger, an ape, etc… Personally, I enjoy the results best when the system is cruelly abused, and given faulty eye and mouth positions – here’s a before and after: