3DMIN Symposium


Last week I was back in Berlin for an exhibition, concert and international symposium on Design, Development, and Dissemination of New Musical Instruments (3DMIN). The symposium was titled “Musical Instruments in the 21st Century — Identities, Configurations, Practices” and included a range of interesting speakers from the 3DMIN project itself and invitees like myself. The other speakers included:

Concerto for T-Stick and Two Laptop Orchestras

Here’s a video from way back in 2011 that only recently noticed on YouTube. It features D. Andrew Stewart playing the T-Stick as instrumental soloist with laptop orchestras from Concordia and McMaster Universities.

The piece was co-composed by Eldad Tsabary (director of the Concordia Laptop Orchestra, CLOrk), D. Andrew Stewart (T-Stick) and David Ogborn (founder of McMaster University’s Cybernetic Orchestra).

Interestingly, there are also a couple of videos online in which composer Kevin Austin presents the video and discusses the piece.

Ableton Loop


I recently had the pleasure of participating as a panelist in Ableton’s Loop Summit in Berlin. Our panel was titled “New Instruments and Evolving Performance Practices”, and was organised by Mark Zadel – a colleague from graduate studies at McGill and now an Ableton employee.

The summit was one of the most interesting, enjoyable conference I have ever attended. It was extremely well organised – despite the fact that there were parallel presentations and activities, it was easy to jump between them and try to catch a bit of everything since almost everything ran exactly on schedule.

Some of my favourite sessions:


Article published in MTAP

Now available online: Malloch, J., Sinclair, S., M. M. Wanderley. Distributed tools for interactive design of heterogeneous signal networks. Multimedia Tools and Applications, 73(2),  2014. DOI: 10.1007/s11042-014-1878-5

We introduce libmapper, an open source, cross-platform software library for flexibly connecting disparate interactive media control systems at run-time. This library implements a minimal, openly-documented protocol meant to replace and improve on existing schemes for connecting digital musical instruments and other interactive systems, bringing clarified, strong semantics to system messaging and description. We use automated discovery and message translation instead of imposed system-representation standards to approach “plug-and-play” usability without sacrificing design flexibility. System modularity is encouraged, and data are transported between peers without centralized servers.